The first step is to set your goals. For many it is simply to finish a marathon. Others wish to get a Personal Best. For some specific time barriers such as the three or four hour marks are the goal or hitting certain qualifying times for marathons such as Boston  Success boils down to the proper balance of quantity and quality of training for whatever level you are at. 

If you are relatively new to serious running and have never run a marathon before, It is best NOT to set a “time goal.” The only goal should be to finish.  But we would like to take this a step further, and that is too finish in a manner where running is part of your life and you would like to continue to run irrespective on whether you run another marathon or not.

   This site will also help determine your ballpark completion time and what training schedules are specifically right for you.

Our goal is to help you set up a simple training program that will provide you maximum benefits, while preventing you from getting injured in the process.

Here is a rough guideline to measure if your current goals are realistic.

TRAINING FOR FIVE HOURS AND OVER – If you haven’t run any races to get a gauge on your time, or if you haven’t YET broken 5 hours, then start here.

TRAINING FOR FIVE HOURS AND UNDER – If you are healthy and injury free and have run any or all of the following: a marathon under 5 hours and ten minutes, 5k under 29 minutes, 10k under 1 hour and 3 minutes, or a half marathon under 2 hour and 20 minutes

TRAINING FOR FOUR HOURS AND UNDERIf you are healthy and injury free and have run any or all of the following: a marathon under 4 hours and ten minutes, 5k under 24 minutes, 10k under 50 minutes, or a half marathon under 1 hour and 50 minutes

TRAINING FOR THREE HOURS AND UNDER – If you are healthy and injury free and have run any or all of the following: a marathon under 3 hours and ten minutes, 5k under 18 minutes, 10k under 38 minutes, or a half marathon under 1 hour 24 minutes

 

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